You're seeing this message because you're using an older version of Internet Explorer that is unsupported on our website. Please use these links to upgrade to a modern web browser that fully supports our website and protects your computer from security risks.

Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox

Google Chrome

Google Chrome

Internet Explorer 8

Hide this message

FSU Tag Line
 


Trees > Oleaceae - Roseaceae

Oleaceae - Olive Family

Common & Scientific Name

Description Uses
Fringetree
Chionanthus virginicus
tree image

Shrub or small tree, 6-20ft; leaves opposite, oval, 3-8" long; white, fragrant flowers in drooping clusters with smooth petals; fruits bluish-black

Native Americans used root-bark tea to wash inflammations, sores, cuts, and infections; once considered diuretic, useful tonic, and alternative

Green Ash
Fraxinus penslyvanicum
tree image

Tree to 100ft; twigs hairless; leaves opposite, pinnate, with 5-9 leaflets, oval, slightly toothed or entire margin; fruits winged Chippewa made a tonic from the inner bark of ash, and they used a decoction of dried ash roots as an ingredient in enemas.

White Ash
Fraxinus americana
tree image

Tree to 100ft; twigs hairless; leaves opposite, pinnate, with 5-9 leaflets, oval, slightly toothed or entire margin; fruits narrow, winged

Used by Connecticut Native Americans to treat cancerous growths. Other antiseptic or diuretic medicines were made from the leaves, bark or seeds.

   
Pineaceae - Pine Family

Common & Scientific Name

Description Uses
Balsam Fir
Abies balsamea
tree image

Coniferous tree with upright cones 1-4" long; grows to 60ft; flattish needles to 1.25" long with two vertical white stripes on underside; bark smooth with resin pockets.

Used as antiseptic and diuretic; leaf tea used for colds, coughs, and asthma; oleoresin pleasantly scented

Red Pine
Pinus resinosa
tree image
Tree to 50ft; 2 long needles per fasicle; cones are ovoid and 1.5-2.5 in long

Used primarily for timber and pulpwood.


White Pine
Pinus strobus
tree image
Largest native conifer in the Northeastern US; 5 needles per fasicle; cones cylindrical and 4-7 in long Used for dimension lumber, millwork, pulpwood
   
Roseaceae - Rose Family

Common & Scientific Name

Description Uses

Black Cherry
Prunus serotina
tree image

Deciduous tree that grows 40-90ft; leaves alternate, oval to lanceolate shaped, blunt toothed, has pubescence on midrib beneath; fruits almost black cherries; bark rough and 'plated' ! Contains cyanide-like glucoside, prunasin, which can be highly toxic! Inner bark used for tea or syrups for coughs, fevers, colds, sore throats, lung ailments, bronchitis, diarrhea, and dyspepsia

Choke Cherry
Prunus virginiana
tree image
Tree, 6-20ft; egg-shaped and bristly sharp-toothed leaves with bare midribs; blossoms and fruits in long clusters and lack spur branches; flowers white; fruits purplish; Tart fruits can be made into jellies and used for pies; songbirds, ruffed grouse, raccoon, black bear, red fox, etc consume fruits

Common Apple
Malus sp.
tree image
Tree; leaves simple, alternate, and doubly serrate; bark gray, broken and scaly; white flower Fruits eaten by humans and wildlife.

Hawthorn
Crataegus sp.
tree image
Distinctive group of shrubs, but species relatively undistinguishable; have long thorns on twigs and trunk; fruits small, yellow to red and apple like, persistent on plants throughout winter

Songbirds frequently use dense thickets of Hawthorn for nesting; fruits consumed by wildlife during winter; many varieties used for landscaping


Serviceberry
Amelanchier arborea
tree image
Shrub to 25ft; bark gray and white striped; leaves alternate, simple and oval to oblong; fruits pomes Serviceberries eaten by bird species, including mockingbirds, cardinals, cedar waxwings, towhees, Baltimore orioles, and many others. Rabbits and deer browse its stems

Sweet Cherry
Prunus avium
tree image
Tree; broad, simple leaves not lobed with  fine, double teeth; bark red-brown and smooth with horizontal lenticels; red, edible drupe fruit Fruits consumed by humans and wildlife. Workers in Europe often use wood for interior finish and for making furniture