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FSU Tag Line
 

Research Stipends
 

Started in 1997, Undergraduate Research Opportunity Stipends (UROS) give students an opportunity to be mentored by, and eventually collaborate with, an FSU professor. Students apply for the program at the end of their first year. If selected, they receive a yearly $1,000 stipend to assist the faculty member with an ongoing research project.

A unique feature of the UROS program is that students and faculty also receive a yearly stipend to travel to professional meetings. The student's work in the UROS project should form the basis for a senior thesis.

Student Research picture

Pictured above are Nicole Wigfield and her research advisor, Dr. Thomas Sigerstad. Nicole presented her tourism research at the Undergraduate Student Research Days in Annapolis, Maryland in 2006 and at conferences in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina in 2006 and Dallas, Texas in 2007. Her research has been published in the International Journal of Business and Public Administration.


Other advisors and students who presented at conferences include:
 

  • Stewart Lentz and his research advisor, Dr. James Saku, who attended the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Chicago, Illinois in 2006. Stewart researched the Nunavut Lane Claim Agreement.
  • Matthew Lamp and his research advisor, Dr. Scott Johnson, who presented at the Northeast Political Science Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 2005.
  • Kelli Murray and her research advisor, Dr. Megan Bradley, who attended the Eastern Psychological Association Meeting in Boston, Massachusettes in 2005 and presented research on "Children's Deception, Behavioral and Psychological Aspects of Lying in Six and Nine Year Olds".