Spring 2021 Plan and Information
COVID-19 Updates and Information

Upcoming Semester Offerings

Fall 2021 Honors Courses

 

Honors program logoHonors Composition

  • ENGL 111: Honors First Year Composition
  • ENGL 312: Honors Advanced Composition

Honors Variants

  • ART 111: Honors Art Appreciation
  • BIOL 159: Honors General Biology I
  • COSC 110: Honors Introduction to Computer Science
  • ECON 211: Honors Principles of Macroeconomics
  • GEOG 113: Honors Physical Geography
  • HIST 111: Honors The Contemporary World
  • PHIL 111: Honors Introduction to Philosophy
  • POSC 112: Honors Introduction to American Politics
  • POSC 114: Honors Introduction to World Politics
  • PSYC 151: Honors General Psychology

Honors Seminars

  • IDIS 491/POSC 470: Seminar in Political Thought
  • IDIS 491/GEOG 490: African American Environmental
  • IDIS 491/SOCI 350: Folklore in Appalachia

Priority registration is March 23.

ART 111: Honors Art Appreciation
Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the representational and visual arts. Focus includes the visual arts’ relationship to civilizations’ ideas, cultural developments in the humanities and iconography. Fall. Credit cannot be earned for both ART 100 and ART 111. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group A. 3 credits. Professor Pat Faville, M/W/F 3-3:50

BIOL 159: Honors General Biology I
Biological principles and concepts. The life processes, development and relationship among organisms. Additional expectations required. Three hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab. Every Fall. Credit cannot be earned for both BIOL 159 and BIOL 149. GEP Group C. Professor David Puthoff M/W/F 1-1:50, Tu 1-2:50

COSC 110: Honors Introduction to Computer Science
A survey of the historical, technological, and societal aspects of computing with a practical component involving contemporary software applications and a programming component using a modern, high-level language. Topics include past and future computing, hardware, software, algorithms, computer systems, data representation and processing, and social and ethical concerns of computing. Practical applications include word processors, spreadsheets, programming languages, graphics packages, Email, Internet and Web page development basics. Credit cannot be earned for both COSC 100 and COSC 110. Fall. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. Tech. Fluency. Professor Michael Root, Tu/Th 9:30- 10:45

ECON 211: Honors Principles of Macroeconomics
An introduction into the forces at work in the national economy including income, employment, and the monetary system. A variety of written research assignments on current topics in macroeconomics required. Credit cannot be earned for both ECON 201 and 211. Fall. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors program or permission of the instructor. GEP Group D. Professor Suzanne McCoskey,  M/W/F  1-1:50

GEOG 113: Honors Physical Geography
Earth-sun relations, map reading interpretation, landforms, elements of weather and climate, and climate regions. Three hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, and four Saturday field trips. Variable. Credit cannot be earned for both GEOG 103 and GEOG 113. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group C. Professor Matthew Ramspott,  M/W/F  8-8:50, Mo 2-3:50

PHIL 111: Honors Introduction to Philosophy
Philosophical problems such as the meaning of existence, freedom and determinism, body versus mind, the existence of God, the human person and human relationships. Credit cannot be earned for both PHIL 101 and PHIL 111. Variable. Prerequisite: acceptance into Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group B. Professor Shoshana Brassfield, M/W 3- 4:15

POSC 112: Honors Introduction to American Politics
Accelerated study of the politics of a democratic society in a constitutional, legal, and cultural context. Major institutions (Congress, president, courts, bureaucracies) of U.S. national government; political behavior of the public. Computer-based data analysis; prior computer experience not necessary. Credit cannot be earned for both POSC 110 and POSC 112. Variable. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of the instructor. GEP Group D. Professor Stephen Simpson, M/W/F 12-12:50

POSC 114 Honors Introduction to World Politics
Accelerated study of major issues in world politics including evolution of the international system, political actors in world politics, patterns of conflict and cooperation, power; nationalism, international political economy, and international organizations. Credit cannot be earned for both POSC 113 and POSC 114. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of the instructor. GEP Group D. 3 credits. Professor Joan Andorfer, Online

PSYC 151 Honors General Psychology
Introduction to the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Basic research findings, methodology, and theoretical, social, and ethical issues. Oral presentations and written reports on outside readings in psychology required. Credit may not be earned for both PSYC 150 and PSYC 151. Fall. Prerequisite: acceptance into the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group D. 3 credits. Professor Paul Bernhardt, Tu/Th 11-12:15

ENGL 111: Honors First Year Composition
Development of intermediate skills in writing based on readings for general audiences. Preparation for honors-level courses. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGL 101 and ENGL 111. Every semester. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Honors Program. Core Skill 1. 3 credits. Professor Jennifer Browne, M/W/F 1-1:50

ENGL 312: Honors Advanced Composition
Development of advanced skills in writing. Both reading and writing assignments more challenging than those in other Advanced Composition courses (ENGL 308, 310). Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: ENGL 308, 309, 310, or 312. Variable. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 101 or ENGL 111, at least 42 credits, and enrollment in Honors Program. Core Skill 2. Professor Gerard LaFemina, M/W/F 12-12:50

IDIS 491/POSC 470: Game Theory and Strategic Thinking
Every day we have to interact with countless other people to make decisions. This course will look at a number of different sources of how humans make decisions, and then how we as humans, can make better decisions. We will explore game theory, which analyzes game to help model human interactions, as well as a number of books on how human beings make decisions, such as Blink by Malcolm Gladwell. The class will be taught as a seminar, and we will try to apply the material to our lives. This class should be accessible to good students from all majors and backgrounds. 3 credits. Professor Stephen Hartlaub, Tu/Th 12:30-1:45

IDIS 491/GEOG 490: African American Environmentalism
Geography explores human-environment interactions. The relationship between African Americans and the natural world in the United States has been complicated by the institutions of slavery and structural racism. This course explores African American environmental thought, experiences, and action from early voices to present-day writers, activists, and organizations. We will consider African American understandings of place, region, landscape, and environmental justice in both rural and urban settings, through both words and visual arts. 3 credits. Professor Richard Russo, Tu/Th 11-12:15

IDIS 491/SOCI 350: Folklore in Appalachia
This course is dedicated to the study of human creativity and tradition as a reflection of culture, community, and place. Appalachian folklore and folklife provide the class’s core content, but its theoretical and methodological approach is expansive, providing students the opportunity to study, document, and value their own cultural traditions and heritage. 3 credits. Professor Kara Rogers Thomas, M/W/F 1-1:50