COVID-19 Updates and Information

Upcoming Semester Offerings

Spring 2022 Honors Courses

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Honors Variants

  • ART 111 Honors: Art Appreciation
  • COSC 110 Honors: Introduction to Computer Science
  • ENGL 111 Honors: First-Year Composition
  • GEOG 114 Honors: Human Geography
  • IDIS 151: Classics Remixed
  • MATH 110 Honors: Elements of App. Probability & Statistics
  • PHIL 112 Honors: Contemporary Ethical Problems
  • PSYC 151 Honors: General Psychology
  • SOCI 111 Honors: Introduction to Sociology

Honors Seminars

  • IDIS 351: Exploring American Culture
  • IDIS 491/SOCI 345: Sociology of the Environment
  • IDIS 491: Immigration in America
  • IDIS 491: American Presidency

Priority registration is November 1.

ART 111 Honors: Art Appreciation Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the representational and visual arts. What is Art? How does it work? What agency (and therefore meaning) did it have and continues to have? The class explores this through hands-on creation of visual imagery. We deal with the very concept of effective design. We look at using imagery to communicate on a symbolic level. We explore the concepts of appealing to group identity and of subject groups. While examining the standard art appreciation subjects (the Visual Elements and Principles of Design, 2D and 3D Media, and the historical context of Art), we look through the lenses of economic and social structures as well. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group A. 3 credits. Professor Pat Faville, M/W/F 3-3:50.

COSC 110 Honors: Introduction to Computer Science A survey of the historical, technological, and societal aspects of computing with a practical component involving contemporary software applications and a programming component using a modern, high-level language. Topics include past and future computing, hardware, software, algorithms, computer systems, data representation and processing, and social and ethical concerns of computing. Practical applications include word processors, spreadsheets, programming languages, graphics packages, Email, Internet and web page development basics. Credit cannot be earned for both COSC 100 and COSC 110. Fall. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. Tech. Fluency. *Remember Tech Fluency is an FSU Graduation Requirement. 3 credits. Professor Michael Root, M/W/F 2- 2:50.

ENGL 111 Honors: First-Year Composition Development of intermediate skills in writing based on readings for general audiences. Preparation for honors-level courses. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGL 101 and ENGL 111. Every semester. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Honors Program. Core Skill 1. 3 credits. Professor Farhad Idris, M/W/F 10-10:50.

GEOG 114 Honors: Human Geography Systematic consideration of factors influencing the distribution of human beings in relation to population dynamics and migration, economic development and urbanization, and cultural diversity. Credit cannot be earned for both GEOG 104 and GEOG 114. Spring. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group D or F. 3 credits. Professor William Wetherholt, Tu/Th 9:30-10:45

IDIS 151: Classics Remixed This course is about creativity and artistic influence. We will explore the theme of adaptation, grounding our inquiry in classic literary texts and then branching out to examine imitations, adaptations, and transformations of the classics in modern works of literature, theater, film, music, and art. The distinction between imitation and inspiration will be considered from the perspectives of literature, law, and the art. 3 credits. Professor Rochelle Smith, Tu/Th 2-3:30

MATH 110 Honors: Elements of App. Probability & Statistics Introduction to statistics, with emphasis on probability theory and inferential statistics. More rigorous and broader than MATH 109/209. Use of the computer as a tool in statistical analyses. Probability theory, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, parametric and nonparametric tests, correlation, regression and analysis of variance. Written research project required. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 109/209 and MATH 110/219. Spring. MAY NOT BE USED TO SATISFY THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR OR MINOR IN MATHEMATICS. MAY BE USED TO FULFILL CORE SKILL 3. 3 credits. Professor Laxman Hedge, Online

PHIL 112 Honors: Contemporary Ethical Problems Contemporary ethical issues such as abortion, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, censorship of pornography and hate speech, sex and marriage, social and economic justice, world hunger and global poverty, the environment and the treatment of animals. Credit cannot be earned for both PHIL 102 and PHIL 112. Variable. Prerequisite: acceptance into Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group B. 3 credits. Professor Skott Brill, Tu/Th 8-9:15

PSYC 151 Honors: General Psychology Introduction to the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Basic research findings, methodology, and theoretical, social, and ethical issues. Oral presentations and written reports on outside readings in psychology required. Credit may not be earned for both PSYC 150 and PSYC 151. Fall. Prerequisite: acceptance into the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. GEP Group D. 3 credits. Professor Paul Bernhardt, Tu/Th 2-3:15

SOCI 111 Honors: Introduction to Sociology Basic concepts, methods of study, and theories about societal structures and processes. Sociological analysis through simulations, selected readings, discussions, and special topics projects. 3 credits. Professor Kara Rogers Thomas, Tu/Th 11-12:15

IDIS 351: Exploring American Culture This course teaches undergraduates how to think about race, gender, war, and class as analytical categories. It continues the conversation started in IDIS-150 Exploring American Culture by providing more in-depth examinations of race, gender, war, and class - helping advance undergraduate students think in more complex ways about how popular culture reflects social conflicts and cultural divides. To be completed after earning 45 hours. Activities emphasize student discussions of assigned readings, oral and written reports. Topics vary. You cannot receive credit for both IDIS 351 and IDIS 350. Repeatable for maximum of 6 credits if topics are substantially different. Prerequisites: Participation in the Honors Program and junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor(s). 3 credits. Professor Gregory Wood, M/W/F 11-11:50.

IDIS 491/SOCI 345: Sociology of the Environment Examines the ambivalent relationship between human society and the natural world. Frames contemporary concerns of environmental crisis within an investigation of societies’ multifaceted attitudes toward and interactions with the natural landscape, focusing on the social dimensions of the surrounding natural and human-made environments. Prerequisites waived for Honors Students - contact Dr. Kara Rogers Thomas for permission if needed. 3 credits. Professor Kara Rogers Thomas, M/W/F  12-12:50.

IDIS 491: Immigration in America Approaching the topic of Immigration in America from a sociological and anthropological perspective, this course examines first-person narratives and accounts of the challenges and opportunities of immigrant life in America.  3 credits. Professor Kara Rogers Thomas, Tu 6-8:30.

IDIS 491: American Presidency This course presents an analysis of the modern American presidency, focusing primarily on the period from the 1930s to the present. It emphasizes the president’s interaction with the federal bureaucracy and Congress in the making of American public policy, both domestic and foreign. Topics include the evolution of the president’s role in the American political system, the nature of presidential power, and the impact of the president’s personality and the White House staff on executive leadership and decision making. Professor Stephen Simpson, M/W/F  10-10:50.